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The Hierarchy of Edits

Lesson 1
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Lesson 2
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Lesson 3
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Lesson 4
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Lesson 5
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Lesson 6
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Lesson 7
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Lesson 8
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Lesson 9
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Lesson 10
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Contributed By Glen Berry

IMPORTANT CONCEPTS
  1. Edits should be invisible
  2. The Hierarchy of Edits
  3. Directors plan for smooth edits

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SUMMARY

  • The best edit is one that is not seen. We have a number of tricks that we can use to hide an edit.
  • Conditions can be exploited to make an invisible edit; they can be placed on a hierarchy from most effective to least effective.
  • The director can do their shot planning in such a way to deliver strong opportunities for the editor to make the transitions between shots.
LESSON
Shot Vocabulary
Descriptions of shot vocabulary.
Creating your Shot List
How to approach creating your shot list from a script, creating the first visualization
Scene Analysis
An analysis of a scene from "A Fistful of Dollars".
The Directors Plan
The director's plan for covering the emotional content and action in the scene without shooting unnecessary footage.
The Hierarchy of Edits
Taking shot transitions into account when shot planning, providing the editor with opportunities to create invisible edits.